Corporate Cultures in the Solar Industry

Corporate Cultures in the Solar Industry

Where do solar panels, batteries and inverters come from? No, they don’t come from solar elves or a retail store. They come from distributors who order in huge quantities directly from manufacturers. These distributors then pick, pack and ship efficiently in smaller quantities to contractors who do the installations. Essentially the same manufacture-distributor-contractor supply chain as in the HVAC, electrical and plumbing industries.

Distributors provide a tremendous service to solar and storage industry. Even though they mark up the equipment slightly to make a profit, they significantly reduce costs for contractors by eliminating overhead and all the hassles with dealing with dozens of vendors and thousands of components. These lower costs flow to the businesses and homeowners that are purchasing systems.

I have learned over the past 20 years in the solar industry that it is more efficient and actually cheaper to order equipment through a good distributor rather than purchase in huge quantities direct from a manufacturer. One of the best distributors in my experience is BayWa r.e. or Baywa for short. They are based in Santa Fe New Mexico, and their parent company is an $18b multi-national equipment/energy company based in Germany.

Other companies distribute solar equipment, but one of the reasons I like working with BayWa is that their team is responsive, efficient and likes what they are doing. These benefits are a result of their corporate culture…yes, I know, a fuzzy term – but it really makes a difference in the competitive solar industry.

Please listen to this week’s Energy Show as we speak with Boaz Soifer, CEO of BayWa. He’ll explain how he has shaped their culture to drive success at BayWa, and also discuss his insights into the common elements of successful solar companies.

2020 Solar Policy Hindsight with Adam Browning

2020 Solar Policy Hindsight with Adam Browning

The United States is a representative democracy. Citizens vote for politicians who, theoretically, advocate for their needs: things like better healthcare, lower taxes, cleaner air, and new technologies such as solar. But one cannot check off the “solar” box on a voting ballot. Instead, we have to vote for elected officials whom we trust will work on solar policy on our behalf.

Vote Solar was founded in 2002 by Adam Browning and David Hochschild to bring solar into the mainstream by helping to shape solar policy. Among the policy wins that Vote Solar has achieved includes incentives (tax credits and rebates), modernizing our electric grid, expanding access to solar and storage technologies across all economic sectors, and advocating for solar + storage friendly electric rates.

Polls across the U.S. show that solar and renewable energy rate 90% and higher in the minds of voters . The challenge is turning that latent voting power into actual political power. Please Listen Up to this week’s Energy Show as Adam Browning, Vote Solar’s Executive Director, explains how their advocacy efforts have achieved so many solar wins to date — along with the hard work we all have ahead of us as we make solar a mainstream energy source throughout the U.S.

Legal Issues for PG&E’s Bankruptcy with Angela Liponovich of Estriatus Law

Legal Issues for PG&E’s Bankruptcy with Angela Liponovich of Estriatus Law

PG&E’s bankruptcy will have a dramatic effect on all electricity users in northern California — as well as utility investors, California taxpayers, and the solar industry in general. Moreover, the bankruptcy of one of the largest utilities in the country is a harbinger of the need to change the traditional utility business model. Not only are utilities experiencing competition from businesses and homeowners installing their own solar and storage systems (for less money), but utilities are also experiencing much greater than expected costs related to maintaining their transmission and distribution services. Devastating fires are more common, people are living in more fire-prone areas, our need for electricity is increasing … and this situation is likely to get worse. (more…)

Solar Innovation Lifecycle with Jamey Johnston

Solar Innovation Lifecycle with Jamey Johnston

According the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) there are about 70 million residential and commercial buildings in the US that are suitable for rooftop solar. The Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) estimates that there are about 1.6 million systems that have already been installed. So with less than 2 percent market penetration, we haven’t even scratched the surface. How long will it take for us to get to say, 10 million solar systems … or 35 million, about half the rooftop capacity in the U.S.? (more…)

Ten Predictions for Rooftop Solar and Storage in 2019

Ten Predictions for Rooftop Solar and Storage in 2019

With the solar industry chaos of 2018 behind us, many of us are looking toward more predictable growth from 2019…at least until the Investment Tax Credit goes to zero for residential and 10% for commercial on December 31, 2021. Then again, we’re on the solar coaster, so it is unwise to be complacent about a rosy solar future — or the broader economy, for that matter. Here are my 10 predictions for 2019. (more…)

Manufacturing Solar in the US with Auxin Solar

Manufacturing Solar in the US with Auxin Solar


Attention U.S. Department of Commerce: your well-intentioned efforts to help the U.S. solar panel manufacturing industry are not working.

Even with 30%+ tariffs on imported solar panels and cells, the remaining U.S. manufacturers are struggling to stay competitive. The good news, as one would expect, is that there is strong demand for Made in the U.S.A. solar panels – both from ordinary consumers as well as government purchases. However, structural issues with the supply chain for solar components puts the remaining U.S. manufacturers at a substantial disadvantage. (more…)