San Jose Clean Energy – The New Electric Utility

San Jose Clean Energy – The New Electric Utility

There is a new electricity provider serving customers in the city of San Jose: San Jose Clean Energy (SJCE). Technically they are not a utility since PG&E still provides distribution services: maintaining local wires and transformers, as well as providing billing. SJCE’s electricity is cleaner (almost all from renewables) and slightly cheaper.

Some people wonder why we need another utility or electricity provider. The reason is simple: investor owned utilities (IOUs) like PG&E charge more for electricity than municipally owned utilities. These new electricity providers, called Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) utilities, are managed by the cities and/or counties they serve, operate with low overheads, and buy power from inexpensive wind and solar farms.

The utility industry is going through a massive transformation. Old fashioned coal, nuclear and gas power plants are more expensive than wind and solar. In fact, business and residential customers can install solar on their rooftops for much less than it costs their local utility to delivery power. Prices for battery storage are dropping, making it cost effective for customers to install a battery system both for time-shifting energy use as well as backup power. As a result of these “behind the meter” electricity technologies, the economics of centrally generated power sold by an investor-owned utility no longer make sense in many locations.

In addition to San Jose Clean Energy, Northern California is already served by CCAs in Marin (Marin Clean Energy), San Mateo (Peninsula Clean Energy), Santa Clara County (Silicon Valley Clean Energy), with about a dozen more CCAs in operation or in formation. To learn more about CCAs and how they are taking off in communities across the U.S., listen up to this week’s Energy Show.



Redesigning the Electric Grid for the Future

Redesigning the Electric Grid for the Future

Our electric grid is one of the most complicated systems that has ever been built. We have confidence that our electrical system is generally meeting the needs of people throughout the U.S. — unlike our electoral and election systems, which are beset by hackers, hanging chads and foreign interference. Nevertheless, new technologies such as solar, wind, battery storage, EVs, control systems and software present opportunities to improve the effectiveness and reduce costs throughout our electrical grid.

(more…)
Legal Issues for PG&E’s Bankruptcy with Angela Liponovich of Estriatus Law

Legal Issues for PG&E’s Bankruptcy with Angela Liponovich of Estriatus Law

PG&E’s bankruptcy will have a dramatic effect on all electricity users in northern California — as well as utility investors, California taxpayers, and the solar industry in general. Moreover, the bankruptcy of one of the largest utilities in the country is a harbinger of the need to change the traditional utility business model. Not only are utilities experiencing competition from businesses and homeowners installing their own solar and storage systems (for less money), but utilities are also experiencing much greater than expected costs related to maintaining their transmission and distribution services. Devastating fires are more common, people are living in more fire-prone areas, our need for electricity is increasing … and this situation is likely to get worse. (more…)

Utility Power Plant Economics

Utility Power Plant Economics

We have all seen those big power plants outside cities that provide power — historically from coal, oil and nuclear and now more recently, natural gas. These utility power plants have served us well for over a century. But technology is passing them by. These old central generation power plants are obsolete. They are more expensive than power generated by wind, solar and energy storage. Even some of the newest gas peaker plants under construction are destined to be obsolete within a decade. New power generating technologies – solar, wind, battery storage, distributed energy resources, virtual power plants, etc. — are steadily improving in terms of cost, duration and reliability. (more…)