Electric Panel Upgrade – With Sue Kateley

Electric Panel Upgrade – With Sue Kateley

To reduce greenhouse gas emissions we need to electrify all of our buildings. New electric appliances — such as heat pumps and induction stoves — are often less expensive to operate than conventional natural gas appliances. For example, at $2/therm for natural gas and $0.30/kwh for electricity, it costs about $1 to heat up a 65 gallon hot water tank for both gas and electricity. Add in rooftop solar and you can heat that tank for less than $0.25!

So from both an economic and environmental standpoint it absolutely makes sense to replace old gas appliances with new electric appliances. Except for one big problem: many older homes have a 100 or 125 amp electrical service — which is insufficient to run most domestic hot water heat pumps, heat pump HVAC systems (heating and cooling), induction electric stoves and level 2 electric vehicle chargers. Not to mention anything other than a relatively small (< 5 kw) rooftop solar power system.

The solution is to contact your electric utility to get an electric panel upgrade to a 200 amp system. Unfortunately, an electric panel upgrade is complicated. Every house is different — some homes have overhead wiring which is relatively easy to replace, and some homes are powered by underground wiring which can take many months and dollars to upgrade.

Navigating the utility and city regulations for electric service upgrades can be a nightmare. To help us understand these issues — as well as the shortcuts and rebates that are available from some utilities — our guest on this week’s show is Sue Kateley. Sue is the former Executive Director of CALSEIA (now known as CALSSA), and has also worked as the Chief of Staff for California State Senator Bradford.

Please listen up to this week’s Energy Show as Sue walks us through her personal experience with PG&E and her electrician as she cost-effectively completed an electric panel upgrade  — and took advantage of some of the little-known incentives and procedures that can make this process much faster and cheaper.

 

Lose the Gas Furnace, Install a Heat Pump

Lose the Gas Furnace, Install a Heat Pump

Natural gas furnaces for heating are the biggest emitters of greenhouse gases generated by homes and offices. Until recently, these furnaces were state-of-the-art, having replaced oil burners, which replaced coal furnaces, which replaced wood stoves.

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) technology continues to improve. Today, without a doubt, heat pumps are the best way to heat and cool buildings. Most common are air-to-air heat pumps – which basically operate as air conditioners in reverse. Water-to-air (connecting to a well) and ground-source (pipes in the ground) heat pumps are also available.

When your air conditioner dies or your gas furnace expires, you should give serious consideration to replacing these old units with a heat pump system. As part of my Whole House Electrification project, I installed a heat pump, replacing an old gas furnace and dead air conditioning system. The new system has lots of advantages, including efficiency (cheaper to operate than a regular AC and gas furnace), comfort (zoned control), flexibility (easy to set temperatures with an internet-connected thermostat), and super-quiet. The furnace removal and heat pump installation project went smoothly: it took fewer than three weeks from hiring a contractor to turning the new system on.

Installing a new HVAC system can be complicated – not unlike installing rooftop solar and battery storage. To help sort through the details, our guest on this week’s show is Alex Sennert with Supreme Heating and Air. Alex has been in the HVAC business for decades, and does a great job of simplifying heat pump technology, summarizing the economics, and selecting the right solution for your building. If you would like to de-carbonize your home or office with a heat pump HVAC system, Listen Up to this week’s Energy Show.

Home Energy Analytics with Steve Schmidt

Home Energy Analytics with Steve Schmidt

Cities and states all over the country are making a big push to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions in both new and existing buildings. Not only are these changes a necessity to slow down global warming trends, but in many cases building energy costs are also dramatically reduced.

Whole House Electrification (WHE), my latest favorite TLA (three letter acroynum) is accomplished by replacing all gas appliances (including your car) with cleaner and more efficient electric appliances such as heat pumps, EV chargers and electric induction stoves. LED lighting, better HVAC controls and upgraded insulation also help reduce building energy consumption.

But starting a WHE project can be daunting — even for an energy geek like me. Conventional wisdom recommends a home energy audit. When I did my energy audit using the DOE’s Home Energy Advisor program it recommended adding insulation to my stucco walls (almost impossible), sealing my ducts (they were really old), upgrading my old furnace and replacing my noisy air conditioner. None of these recommendations were really right for me.

The reason is that traditional energy audits do not take into account the dizzying array of electric appliances, toys and embedded devices that power our 21st century lifestyle. Most of these energy audits are flat out wrong — ignoring rooftop solar, battery storage, heat pumps and time-of-use electric rates. Combined, these new technologies provide significant savings for an electric home.

Luckily, I found a kindred soul, Steve Schmidt, a pioneer in the new energy analysis industry. Steve founded Home Energy Analytics, which uses smart utility meter data to figure out what is really going on with energy in your house. Please Listen Up to this week’s Energy Show for Steve’s approach to prioritizing and then reducing energy costs, as well as his insights into Whole House Electrification.

Whole House Electrification with Howard Wenger

Whole House Electrification with Howard Wenger

To slow the global warming trend, a number of states have committed to the aspirational goal of 100% carbon-free energy. As a species that literally evolved from burning wood and hydrocarbons, how can we possibly run our modern lives and economy without fossil fuels?

We can indeed achieve this transition quickly and economically. First, by converting all power generation to renewable, non-carbon sources. And second, by converting all fossil-fuel burning vehicles and appliances to electricity. Steady progress towards these conversions is being made. For example, 32% of California’s retail power came from renewable energy in 2018. The state is well on the way to converting to 100% renewable electricity. Use of EVs is growing steadily, and new building codes mandate the use of rooftop solar and electric appliances instead of natural gas.

The challenge is with the existing stock of residential and commercial buildings. Homes and businesses predominantly use natural gas for space heating, hot water heating and cooking. That’s where the concept of Whole House Electrification come in. Whole House Electrification is conceptually simple: replace gas appliances with electric appliances. In reality, one needs an energy audit to prioritize these conversions, then hire five different specialty contractors to do the work: insulation, solar, HVAC, plumbing, electrical and pool. It can be a daunting task.

Fortunately there are some pioneers out there – one of whom is my friend Howard Wenger. Howard was also a pioneer in the solar industry, with stints at AstroPower, PowerLight and SunPower. Please listen up to this week’s Energy Show as Howard discusses his experiences as he converted his house to 100% electricity, supplied — naturally — by solar.